Tag Archive: mormonism


(reposted from: http://notjustonereason.wordpress.com/2013/07/23/those-with-nothing-to-hide-hide-nothing/)

Those with nothing to hide, hide nothing

23 Jul 2013

The LDS church has recently (July 13, 2013) unveiled a new search engine powered by Google and censored by LDS inc.

The Church has revamped the search function and features to include Google’s powerful search technology, harnessing its signature ability to find relevant information.

Relevant information? What does that mean?

That means: Official, Safe Content

Official? Safe?

The new search provides a more safe and Church-specific search experience than Google, said Brother Ward. When you search from Google’s website, the results you get back may or may not be official content, he explained. Some results might be links to members’ personal blogs or even anti-Church sites.

The LDS.org search, however, only returns links to official Church-approved content that is currently available on LDS.org and other Church websites. And even though Google’s technology is used, no user information is provided back to Google. “It provides a safe, private, shock-free environment to search for approved gospel resources,” said Brother Ward.

So you can search only church approved sources and get only church approved answers to all your gospel questions.

Why is that needed? Because people (good, faithful LDS people) are searching Google for help with their lesson plans for Young Women’s, Priesthood, Seminary…. and getting back “shocking” information about the church. Shocking because it’s information they’ve never heard before that it true- and the more and more they search the more and more they learn about this information- and then they leave the LDS church because they feel lied to and betrayed. So how does the Church deal with this problem? Not by being more open and honest and teaching this information themselves- no- they deal with it by trying to bury it further.

For example- let’s search polyandry. Now we know that polyandry is when a man marries a woman that is already married. Joseph Smith did this 11 times before he died. Let’s see what the search on LDS.org turns up. (You can use Ctrl + to zoom in)

The first result is D&C 132:51. Not bad considering that the entire section is about plural marriage. Let’s see which verse specifically it found.

51 Verily, I say unto you: A commandment I give unto mine handmaid, Emma Smith, your wife, whom I have given unto you, that she stay herself and partake not of that which I commanded you to offer unto her; for I did it, saith the Lord, to aprove you all, as I did Abraham, and that I might require an offering at your hand, by covenant and sacrifice.

Hmm. Nothing explaining polyandry, mentioning Joseph and polyandry- instead it’s a verse threatening Emma that if she were to engage in polyandry herself (with William Law specifically) then she would be disobeying God. But you’d only know that’s what this verse was referring to if you’d read lots of other church history. But it shows that the search function knows what you’re talking about.

What about the other search results? Do they go into more depth? Explain polyandry with a definition? Mention any one of the 11 women who sacrificed and married Joseph in polyandry?

No. You get an I’m a Mormon profile with no mention, two Seminary lessons with no mention and that aren’t relevant to the search, and then a list of feel good church magazine articles that aren’t at all relevant.

So how did Google do? (Once again Ctrl + to zoom in)Google polyandry1Google polyandry

Google leads with MormonThink.com to a page specifically about polygamy, polyandry and a helpful infographic of the wives of Joseph Smith.

The next link is to FAIR- a site considered to be friendly to tough LDS questions. They define polyandry, discuss how it relates to Joseph’s marriages and then give links to other questions you may have about polyandry in general.

Following that is a link to a FAIR conference talk by Brian Hales who is known for his research into polygamy and polyandry and has released a couple of books exploring the topics. While I disagree with his conclusions (and so do most notable historians) it’s still relevant information if you want a well rounded picture about polyandry.

Then there is a youtube video, an article from Dialogue, and a blog post by Times and Seasons.

Eighth on the list is LDS.org.

So maybe there is a search result on LDS.org that the search function before didn’t find! So I clicked on it. This is what came back.

The exact same search I’d already done on LDS.org.

There is some text in the Google search under that result that says this:

LDS Mormons do not currently practice polygamy, polygyny, nor polyandry. The principles of this biblical practice were revealed to Joseph Smith Jr. from 1831.

So if you want to know what polyandry is- or why it’s relevant to the history of the church lds.org won’t tell you anything. It doesn’t even say it was practiced by Joseph Smith- just that the principles were revealed to him.

What you will find is:

The Church has revamped the search function and features to include Google’s powerful search technology, harnessing its signature ability to find relevant information.

So relevant information? What does that mean?

It means that the church is still hiding information the best they can. It means that knowledge is power- and the church- LDS Inc. is trying to take that power away from you.

When are they going to stop trying to hide the truth and just come clean? When are they going to start being ‘honest with their fellowmen’?

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Most Americans know very little of the The Church of Latter Day Saints, or theMormon Church, and even less about its founder, the religious megalomaniac, con artist, tyrant and mentally unstable “prophet” Joseph Smith. The Mormons will most likely be solemnly celebrating the day in which their founder, their prophet, was killed, treating the occasion as though he were a lamb taken to slaughter like Jesus Christ. And so a little biographical detail and history lesson is in order.

A good resource for an objective chronology of Joseph Smith’s Illinois perambulations lies in the book “A History of Illinois: From its Commencement as a State in 1818 to 1847.” The book’s author was Thomas Ford, the Governor of Illinois at the time. Ford, naturally, is not a little harsh with the Mormons, but how else could someone have responded when a treasure-hunting failed businessman attempted to set up a religious state in Nauvoo, Illinois. Perhaps Ford was wrong to entrust Smith and his brother Hyrum’s lives to the Carthage Greys, an anti-Mormon faction, but things then were not as they are now. Mob justice was always a possibility, especially during the time of Manifest Destiny.

Another good point of reference is John Krakauer’s “Under the Banner of Heaven: A Story of Violent Faith.” Krakauer is known for his non-fiction prowess, and what readers will not get is the Mormon white-washing and distortion of historical events. “The Maze of Mormonism” by Dr. Walter Martin is also highly useful in understanding LDS.

In this article, however, we are only interested in the events leading up to Smith’s execution. Even a brief look at Smith’s chronology of travels across the midwest reveals failure after failure in creating a Mormon “Zion.” Indeed, “If at first you don’t succeed…” must have been Smith’s primary operating principle throughout his adult life. To be fair, however, the Mormons did suffer their fair share of scorn from non-Mormon; but the reaction to the scorn should have in no way led to a theocratic city-state with a standing army.

And, remember, America has always been a country rich in a variety of religious movements, most of which sprouted like tendrils from the protestant reformation. None seem to have attempted to create a theocratic city-state that would establish a state (or city) religion and abridge the First Amendment, as the early days of LDS shall illustrate.

In 1831, several years before heading to Illinois, Smith and LDS leaders set up a Mormon community in Kirtland, Ohio, hoping to establish the form of society they had envisioned. It was here that Smith and other church leaders attempted to establish a bank backed by real estate that Mormon followers would be encouraged to use, according to Fawn Brodie’s biography “No Man Knows My History: The Life of Joseph Smith.” (Rather good idea for a money-making venture, no?)

Brodie writes:

“The toppling of the Kirtland bank loosed a hornets’ nest. Creditors swarmed in upon Joseph armed with threats and warrants. He was terribly in debt. There is no way of knowing exactly how much he and his leading elders had borrowed, since the loyal Mormons left no itemized account of their own claims. But the local non-Mormon creditors whom he could not repay brought a series of suits against the prophet which the Geauga county court duly recorded. These records tell a story of trouble that would have demolished the prestige and broken the spirit of a lesser man.

Thirteen suits were brought against him between June 1837 and April 1839, to collect sums totaling nearly $25,000. The damages asked amounted to almost $35,000. He was arrested seven times in four months, and his followers managed heroically to raise the $38,428 required for bail. Of the thirteen suits only six were settled out of court-about $12,000 out of the $25,000. In the other seven the creditors either were awarded damages or won them by default.” (pp. 198-202)

After fleeing from Kirtland following a warrant issued on account of bank fraud and multiple lawsuits, Smith moved to Far West, Missouri to establish yet another Zion, which is where the religion received its new name—The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

It was in Far West where Smith and some of his followers become more militant in their faith, adopting a paranoia of persecution by non-Mormons and disaffected Mormons alike—something typical of a great deal of revealed religions. A series of events during this time led to the 1838 Mormon War, which saw Mormons and Non-Mormons raiding each other’s towns, ultimately leading to the Battle of Crooked Creek, which found Smith and his Mormon army attacking a state militia—yes, a state militia. Smith’s army eventually surrendered and were tried for treason, but Smith was spirited away in April of 1839, thus avoiding trial.

Next stop: Nauvoo, Illinois.

Once in Nauvoo, Smith and his followers (those who hadn’t sensed his long con), made some friends in the Illinois government and received a charter for the city that would allow him to make it something of a city-state, or an autonomous zone, where the “oppressed” Mormon minority could feel safe and escape persecution. They were also granted a militia, the Nauvoo Legion, with John C. Bennett (a Mormon convert), and former member of the Illinois legislature, installed as Mayor. It was in Nauvoo that Smith introduced the concepts of polygamy and bigamy (revealed by God, of course). By 1842, Smith was intent on making Nauvoo the capital of a great American theocratic state. Good times.

Missouri officials attempted to have Smith extradited for the charges of treason, but Smith escaped on a writ of habeas corpus specifically designed for the city of Nauvoo. As Gov. Ford wrote in his book:

They enacted that no writ issued from any other place than Nauvoo, for the arrest of any person in it, should be executed in the city, without an approval endorsed thereon by the Mayor; that if any public officer, by virtue of any foreign writ, should attempt to make an arrest in the city, without such approval of his process, he should be subject to imprisonment for life, and that the Governor of the State should not have the power of pardoning the offender without the consent of the Mayor. When these ordinances were published, they created general astonishment. Many people began to believe in good earnest that the Mormons were about to set up a separate government for themselves in defiance of the laws of the state. (pg. 320)

With Missouri unable to extradite Smith, the LDS founder attempted to get guarantees of assistance from federal politicians. When these efforts failed, Smith announced his candidacy for the Presidency of the United States. Megalomania anyone?

At this point, according to ex-communicated author LDS member D. Michael Quinn, Smith organized the secret Council of Fifty to decide which state and federal laws the Mormon church would obey, but also find locations for a new Mormon theocratic state (California, Texas and Oregon were early candidates—Utah, of course, would become the ultimate site). Richard Ostling, a respected writer on religion in America, noted in his book “Mormon America: The Power and the Promise” that Smith and church leaders were intent on setting up a “theodemocracy” with Smith installed as ”Prophet, Priest, and King” of the Mormon Church, according to church leader William Clayton.

As Ford wrote:

It seems, from the best information which could be got from the best men who had seceded from the Mormon church, that Joe Smith about this time conceived the idea of making himself a prince as well as a spiritual leader of his people… He caused himself to be crowned and anointed king and priest, far above the rest… To uphold his pretensions of royalty, he deduced his descent by an unbroken chain from Joseph to the son of Jacob…” (Ford, pg. 322)

As in the monarchies of Europe, Smith was accumulating a divine mandate for kingly power, which had long been a repugnant idea to Americans, who had abhorred the tyranny of King George. One must wonder at this point if the real goal wasn’t so much to give the people divine revelation, but to simply accumulate power and money, to say nothing of a king’s ready access to a harem. Smith’s actions were more likely an admixture of religious delusion and greed.

By this time, John Bennett had been excommunicated for sexual indiscretions (a victim of a double standard it would seem), and so Smith was now both Mayor and President of LDS, making Nauvoo officially a theocratic city-state. How it was that Smith and company escaped state and federal law up until this point is truly astonishing: the political situation was a clear violation of the separation of church and state.

At this point, Smith’s doctrine of polygamy and power began to unsettle certain of his followers. Some were none too disposed toward adopting polygamy, nor in bestowing such political and religious power upon Smith. These critics created a newspaper, the Nauvoo Expositor, which published opinions that Smith was a false prophet, too powerful and had corrupted women by forcing them into plural marriages.

Naturally, Smith had the paper censored after just one issue since he believed it was creating a threat to his person. Smith was quoted as saying in the City Council’s minutes, “…would rather die tomorrow and have the thing smashed, than live and have it go on, for it was exciting the spirit of mobocracy among the people, and bringing death and destruction upon us.”

Soon after, warrants from outside Nauvoo were issued against Smith, which he countered with his writ of habeas corpus, believing himself to be beyond the laws of man. On June 18, according to Edwin Brown Firmage and Richard Collin Mangrum, Smith declared Martial law and raised an army of 5,000 men.

A trial was to be held in the County seat of Carthage, and Smith eventually opted to face trial after Gov. Ford guaranteed his safety. They were brought to trial on the crime of treason against the State of Illinois; which, of course, was a capital offense in the United States at that time. Smith, however, would never make it to trial. Ford left Carthage and Smith in the hands of the anti-Mormon Carthage Greys. The jail was stormed by a 200-strong mob, where Smith and Hyrum were killed. (The Nauvoo Legion, it should be noted, was never summoned to defend Smith and company.)

Though Smith’s end was unfortunate, credit must be given to Ford for averting all-out war by convincing Smith to surrender. Remember, Smith had raised an army of 5,000 from the Nauvoo Legion and basically invited the Illinois Governor to put down the insurrection, which he had every right to do. Smith’s actions before and during the revolution displayed a fundamental disregard for the very idea of America’s freedom from any official religion.

If the State of Illinois had nipped the problem of Smith and his militarized theocratic Nauvoo city-state in the bud early, Smith’s execution might have been averted. And while Governor Ford may have had it in for Smith and the Mormon Church, and could have addressed problems differently, he did ensure that the First Amendment, which Smith necessarily despised, still meant something.

And one can’t help thinking that Smith’s aim all along was to create a situation by which his opponents, whether non-Mormons or his Mormon critics, would create a contemporary persecution and execution that was Christ-like, delivered by the hands of American Pontius Pilates and Jewish analogues. As he said,  ”I am going like a lamb to the slaughter; but I am calm as a summer’s morning; I have a conscience void of offense towards God, and towards all men. I shall die innocent, and it shall yet be said of me — he was murdered in cold blood.”

And this is the story that the LDS church has propagated—that Smith was a religious martyr. Yes, a martyr who trampled on the U.S. constitution, committed various acts of treason, engaged in censorship, all in an effort to create a militarized theocratic city-state somewhere, anywhere, and at all costs. He was the very definition of a tyrant. And tyrants, as history has so often shown, meet their ends at the hands of a mob.

They can call it an “assassination” all they want, but the fact remains that Joseph Smith was a violator of the U.S. constitution. If he’d respected it and not gotten caught up in religious fanaticism, he might have lived—in which case, the Church wouldn’t have its martyr.

Now readers know a little bit more about the church of which Mitt Romney is a member.

I resigned my membership in the LDS church just a little over 3 years ago. Although life did not magically change into a worry-free fairyland, it became considerably less complicated, less burdensome, and brighter. Although I have encountered losses along the way, such as several, close, family relationships, I have never known greater personal peace. I truly know and love myself. Life is better than ever!

From Saturday’s Daily Telegraph (http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/damianthompson/100111255/does-mitt-romney-believe-the-mormon-myths/)

Mitt Romney’s Mormon faith is private, his supporters tell us. Nine times out of 10, when a politician’s religious beliefs are “private”, that’s shorthand for “virtually non-existent”. Barack Obama is “privately” religious in that sense, one suspects: his attendance at the Rev Jeremiah Wright’s loopy black power services in Chicago was a vote-gathering exercise, not a soul-saving one. But Romney? Every time the M-word is mentioned, his camp tells us to move along now, there’s nothing to see. The more they tell us that his Mormonism isn’t an issue, however, the more curious I am to ask the former governor of Massachusetts: “How much of this stuff do you actually believe?”

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) has a habit of crying “Not fair!” when the media draw attention to its exotic beliefs. I sympathise – up to a point. If Mormons believe that the angel Moroni appeared to Joseph Smith and showed him a new Christian testament written on gold plates, that’s up to them. Seen from a secular perspective, the episode isn’t any stranger than angelic visitations in the Bible or Koran. Likewise, the Mormon claims that God lives near a planet called Kolob and that humans can become gods of their own universes aren’t intrinsically odder than transubstantiation. And why keep raising the topic of polygamy more than a century after the LDS abandoned it?
But we’re entitled to keep prodding when a religion goes out of its way to rewrite what scientists and historians have discovered about the world – as fundamentalist Christianity does when it offers us the nonsense of “scientific Creationism”. And the truth is that Mormonism, uniquely among large-scale religions, is built around an elaborate counter-historical fantasy.

The Mormon Church tells us that America was colonised by Israelites who sailed to the New World in 600 BC. This is a matter of record, says the LDS. Indeed, it’s a “fact” that the young Mitt Romney spent two and a half years spreading when he was a missionary in France. Also integral to the Church’s teaching is the claim that Native Americans are descended from the “unrighteous” remnant of those Israelites, the Lamanites, whose sinfulness left them with dark skin but who will one day be saved.

During the 20th century, some Mormons became increasingly embarrassed by this Lost Tribes hokum. But it didn’t turn into an intellectual crisis for the Church until the discovery of DNA, which established beyond doubt that today’s American Indians have no Hebrew ancestry. Cue something approaching panic at Brigham Young University, Utah, whose anthropologists now claim that only some Indians were descended from Israelites and that the Hebrew DNA got swallowed up over time. This revisionism has shocked many ordinary Mormons – not least American Indian LDS members who converted after being told about their thrilling heritage.

Call me nosey, but I want to know if Mitt Romney – a major donor to Brigham Young University – stands by the Lost Tribes theory. It’s not a doctrine: it’s a detailed hypothesis that seeks to overturn the orthodox narrative of pre-Columbian history. So far, Romney has refused to go anywhere near this territory. But, if he’s as serious about his faith as he says he is, then he ought to tell us what he believes. Here’s an idea. During the election campaign, why doesn’t a Native American ask him: “Mr Romney, do you believe I’m descended from Old Testament Jews?” Mitt the young missionary would have said yes. Let’s see what Mitt the presidential candidate has to say.

(Original post by Mikeutah on Life After Mormonism)

MormonBeliefs.org does a pretty good job presenting the official beliefs or doctrines of the LDS church, which is a nice presentation to lure unsuspecting investigators over to their thinking via a “milk before meat” approach so as to ease new investigators ever so subtly into the weird or ultra conservative beliefs that are learned or discovered once a confirmed member, and which would otherwise scare most investigators away.  Let’s take this thread and turn it into a compiled list of unwritten or less publicized mormon beliefs and cultural expectations so as to arm unsuspecting investigators from being tricked into buying undesirable”meat”.  I’ll continually update this main post with all the varying beliefs we come up with from our own experience and time in Mormonism.  If beliefs you add stem from official doctrine or leaders, please include a source reference.  You may also include brief descriptions that expound how particular beliefs play out in Mormon culture.  Not all of these are followed or believed by all active Mormons, but are often used as a gauge by the more self-righteous Mormons to judge the righteousness of others.

Unwritten or Nonpublic Mormon Beliefs

  • Polygamy is still doctrinal in heaven and included in LDS scripture.  See D&C 132
  • Sports should not be played on Sunday
  • TV or movies should not be viewed on Sunday (except Church or “happy” media)
  • Children should not be allowed to play with friends on Sunday
  • Working on Sunday is strictly discouraged and really only not looked down on if you’re an emergency response personnel, or other on-call emergency type jobs (doctors, police, firemen, nurses etc)
  • Rated R movies should be strictly avoided
  • 10% of your gross income (tithing) needs to be paid to the bishop/church before you pay for any other financial obligations, bills, food or other purchases
  • Coffee and tea are prohibited even though they aren’t specifically referenced by doctrine
  • For some families, all caffeinated drinks and sodas are prohibited
  • If you have dark skin and convert to Mormonism, your skin will begin to lighten/whiten
  • You become a God/Goddess and are given powers to create your own worlds without number
  • You should not be alone in a room or car with a member of the opposite sex to “avoid even the appearance of evil”
  • Beer is prohibited even though it is scripturally allowed (D&C 89:17) “…and barley for all useful animals, and for mild drinks, as also other grain”  Beer was openly consumed in Utah by Mormons until Prohibition made it unpopular and the practice ceased.
  • The Garden of Eden was in Missouri when Adam and Eve were kicked out
  • All saints are to return to Missouri before the final arrival of Jesus for the Second Coming.  Some believe this exodus back to Missouri would be on foot.
  • Two LDS Elders or Missionaries will stand and protect the city of Jerusalem during Armageddon, as spoken of in Revelations and D&C 77:15
  • Native Americans are the descendants of the Lamanites spoken of in the Book of Mormon
  • The LDS Temple marriage is considered superior to all other religious marriage ceremonies and must be obtained if you want to be with your spouse in the after life.  Not married in the temple?  Too bad, no spouse/partner in the after life.
  • Love isn’t as strong between couples and families who are not LDS
  • Follow the prophet or leaders even if you think they are wrong
  • Criticism of prophets or leaders will lead you towards apostasy
  • Don’t use Ouija boards, face cards or tarot cards.  They are of the devil.
  • The US Constitution will hang by a thread and be saved by LDS Elders before the 2nd coming
  • Women were discouraged from wearing pants up until the late ’60s or ’70s
  • 3 Nephites still rome the Earth from Christ’s visit to the America’s, blessed by Him to not experience death until his second coming
  • The moon will literally turn to blood during second coming crisis
  • Heavenly Mother/Goddess exists, but she/them are too sacred to discuss and cannot be worshiped or prayed to
  • Only Mormon’s can go to the highest degree of heaven, which is why proxy ordinances are done in LDS temples for as many dead people as LDS Inc can get their hands on
  • Kids or babies who die before reaching 8 years old are perfect and automatically get into heaven
  • Missionaries can curse people by dusting their feet off as a witness to them rejecting the gospel
  • Satan has power over the oceans, lakes and rivers which is why LDS Missionaries are not allowed to swim
  • Satan can’t read your thoughts so praying silently can help keep some of your secrets from him
  • Dating is strictly prohibited until you’re 16 and then only group dating is allowed or encouraged until you can marry after your mission or marry a return missionary
  • Doctrinal polygamy gives the 1st wife authority to reject any prospects she doesn’t like.  This was never really practiced though.
  • Women who fail to marry in the temple during their life will be assigned a worthy spouse in the hereafter and likely as a sister wife with a harem of women
  • Black people bear the curse of Cain and were born black because they were less valiant in the pre-existence (pre-Earth life) and sat on the fence as to whether to follow Satan/Lucifer or Jesus
  • Cremation will make being resurrected harder, having to recollect all of your atoms/molecules from where ever they were spread
  • God the father is only one of millions or endless Gods who are all basically relatives, fathers, brothers, grand-gods and so forth to our own God.  If we’re worthy, we get to join the God club too.
  • From the polygamy days, a man had to have at least 2 wives to get into the highest degree of heaven
  • A woman’s purpose in heaven is solely to birth endless babies to populate the worlds created by their husbands.  Billions and billions of babies!
  • Gestation is still 9 months in heaven
  • You are better off dying trying to fend off a rapist than to survive as a victim of rape, your virginity forever stolen from you
  • Temple garments or underwear will protect you from physical harm or the grasp of Satan
  • Girls can only have one piercing in each ear.  No piercings allowed by boys/men.
  • Tattoos are a big no-no and should never be allowed to defile your bodies.  If you have tattoos when you convert, you may be encouraged to pay for laser removal at your own expense.
  • Flip-flops are not to be worn in the church building
  • All forms of birth control (condoms, pills, etc) are discouraged and the couple should allow as many children into their home as God decides to send them
  • The Earth was not created by God, but by Jesus and Michael/Adam as taught in the LDS Temple endowment ceremony
  • Secret hand shakes, keywords and signs are provided in the Temple endowment as passwords and keys to get back into heaven, like a kids club where only those with the secret passwords can get in
  • The church partners with Boy Scouts of America for the development of males but does not endorse nor partner with the Girl Scout programs or similar female development programs
  • The Holy Ghost is threatened or turned away by bars, clubs and “dirty” places so will not protect you or guide you if you choose to enter such filthy places
  • Mormon Garments must be worn day and night, only removed for sex, showering and some sporting activities
  • Women must wear their bras and panties over their garments, as the garment should be the layer closest to the skin for maximum protection
  • If you’re not a Mormon, or are unworthy without a temple recommend, you get excluded from the Temple wedding ceremony of loved ones, kids, siblings or best friends
  • Mormon’s do feel there is something special about them, or that they are better than non-mormons.  Having the ultimate “truth” does that to people.
  • Masturbation is a sexual sin/transgression and seen as cheating on your existing or future spouse
  • Sexual transgression is a sin next to murder in God’s eyes
  • Jesus atoned for our sins in the Garden of Gethsemane, not on the cross
  • Jesus wasn’t born of a virgin.  God had natural sex with Mary to impregnate Jesus
  • You can’t get into heaven without Joseph Smith’s permission
  • You can visit loved ones in lower kingdoms, but you cannot visit higher kingdoms of heaven if you didn’t merit it yourself, though they can visit you (see D&C 76)
  • You can tell the difference between a good angel, bad angel or resurrected being by their willingness or ability to shake your hand
  • No rainbows shall appear during the year before Jesus’ second coming
  • If you’ve had a sex change, you cannot ever hold any callings/jobs in the church and only get baptized at the express permission of the First Presidency/prophet
  • Role playing games, like D&D, are also evil
  • Dinosaur fossils are to test our faith, and likely came from matter left over from past destroyed planets that were used/recycled to create Earth
  • When a prophet or leader errors, it was because he was acting as a man and not as a prophet.  There’s no indication until after the fact as to whether he was acting as one or the other, so you should always presume he’s acting as prophet until proven otherwise
  • Free agency and choice is revered, but don’t make the wrong choice or we will judge, look down on and guilt you until you either stop making said wrong choices
  • Once the prophet or brethren have spoken, the thinking has been done.  Don’t question it.
  • When someone leaves the church, it is God’s way of separating the wheat (good mormons) from the chaff (bad, evil apostates)
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